The 10 Tallest Mountains in Canada

1. Mount Logan is the highest mountain in Canada and the second-highest peak in North America after Mount Denali. It is located in the Saint Elias Mountains of Yukon, on the border with Alaska. Standing at 19,541 feet, Mount Logan is a prominent landmark in the Canadian wilderness and a popular challenge for mountaineers.

The mountain was named after Sir William Logan, a Canadian geologist and founder of the Geological Survey of Canada. It was first successfully climbed in 1925 by a Canadian expedition led by Albert H. MacCarthy. The ascent is considered one of the greatest achievements in Canadian mountaineering history.

The mountain is known for its extreme weather conditions, with temperatures reaching below -40 degrees Celsius and strong winds. This, combined with challenging terrain, makes it a difficult climb even for experienced mountaineers.

 

2. Mount Saint Elias, located on the border between Alaska and the Yukon, is the second highest peak in both Canada and the United States. At 18,009 feet, it is also the highest point in the Saint Elias Range and the fourth highest in the North American continent overall. The name “Saint Elias” comes from the biblical prophet Elijah, who is known as Elias in some Christian traditions. The mountain is surrounded by glaciers, making it a popular destination for ski mountaineers. The first successful ascent of Mount Saint Elias was in 1897 by a group of four British climbers. However, the mountain was not climbed from the Canadian side until 1946 by an American expedition. Its proximity to the Pacific coast also means that the weather conditions are often volatile and unpredictable, adding to the challenge of climbing this majestic peak.

 

3. Lucania, at 17,257 feet, is the third highest peak in Canada and the highest in the southwestern Yukon. It is located in the icefields of the St. Elias Range and is part of the same massif as Mount Logan. The mountain was named after Lucania, a district in southern Italy, by the leader of the first ascent team, Bradford Washburn. It was first climbed in 1937 by two American climbers, Allen Carpé and Terris Moore. The ascent was challenging, with the climbers facing technical difficulties and unpredictable weather. Today, the mountain remains a popular destination for experienced mountaineers looking for a challenging climb in a remote and beautiful alpine setting.

 

4. King Peak, at 16,972 feet, is the fourth highest peak in Canada and is located on the border between the Yukon and British Columbia. It is part of the Pinnacle Mountains, a sub-range of the St. Elias Mountains. The mountain was named after Bill King, a Canadian geographer who discovered it in 1930 during an aerial survey. The first ascent of King Peak was in 1942 by an American expedition led by famed mountaineer Walter Wood. The climb is considered a classic among mountaineers due to the challenging terrain and difficult glacier travel. The mountain remains a remote and difficult peak to climb, with only a handful of successful ascents each year.

 

5. Mount Steele, standing at 16,470 feet, is the fifth highest mountain in Canada and the second highest in the St. Elias Range after Mount Logan. It is located on the border between the Yukon and Alaska and was named after Sir Sam Steele, a Canadian Mountie known for his exploration of the Yukon in the late 19th century. Mount Steele was first climbed in 1935 by a party of four climbers, including veteran mountaineer Norman Clyde. The ascent was challenging, with the climbers facing severe weather conditions and technical terrain. Today, it remains a popular climb for experienced mountaineers due to its remote location and difficult ascent.

 

6. Mount Wood, located in Yukon, is the sixth highest peak in Canada at 15,945 feet. The mountain was named after army officer Wildred Wood, who was one of the first Europeans to travel through the region in the late 19th century. It is part of the same massif as Mount Logan and Lucania, but its ascent is considered even more challenging due to its rugged and remote location. The first successful ascent of Mount Wood was in 1947 by an American expedition led by mountaineer Bob Bates. Today, the mountain is still climbed regularly by experienced mountaineers seeking a difficult and rewarding challenge.

 

7. Mount Vancouver, at 15,787 feet, is the seventh highest peak in Canada and the highest peak in British Columbia. It is part of the St. Elias Mountains and is located on the border between the Yukon and Alaska. The mountain was named after Captain George Vancouver, who explored the coast of British Columbia in the late 18th century. The first ascent of Mount Vancouver was in 1945 by an American expedition led by Allen Carpé. The climb is challenging, with steep and glaciated terrain, and is recommended only for experienced mountaineers.

 

8. Mount Slaggard is the eighth highest peak in Canada, standing at 15,558 feet. It is located in the western Yukon, near the Alaska border. The mountain was named after Canadian geologist Jack Slaggard, who mapped the region in the 1950s. The first successful ascent of Mount Slaggard was in 1960 by an American expedition led by Terris Moore. The climb is considered extremely difficult, with remote and rugged terrain, and remains a challenge for mountaineers looking to conquer all of Canada’s highest peaks.

 

9. Fairweather Mountain, at 15,325 feet, is the ninth highest peak in Canada and the highest peak in British Columbia’s Fairweather Range. It is located on the border between the Yukon and Alaska and was named by Captain James Cook in 1778. The mountain is known for its difficult weather conditions, with temperatures dropping to -30 degrees Celsius and high winds. The first ascent of Fairweather Mountain was in 1931 by an American expedition led by Allen Carpé. It remains a popular climb for experienced mountaineers seeking a challenging and remote ascent.

 

10. Mount Hubbard, at 14,951 feet, is the tenth highest peak in Canada and is located on the Alaska-Yukon border. It was named after Gardiner Hubbard, the first president of National Geographic Society, in 1890. The first successful ascent of Mount Hubbard was in 1890 by an American expedition led by Israel Russell. The mountain is known for its complex and rugged terrain, making it a challenging and rewarding climb for mountaineers. It remains a remote and sought-after peak for experienced climbers looking to conquer all of Canada’s highest peaks.

 

Where does Kilimanjaro compare to these mountains?

Kilimanjaro, at 19,341 feet, is the highest peak in Africa and the highest freestanding mountain in the world, but it does not compare to the height of these ten highest mountains in Canada. However, Mount Logan and Mount Saint Elias are comparable in height to Kilimanjaro.

Mount Logan is only slightly taller than Kilimanjaro, while Mount Saint Elias is slightly shorter. Both Kilimanjaro and Mount Saint Elias are known for their challenging terrain, extreme weather conditions, and stunning scenery.

However, the Canadian mountains mentioned above are more technical and difficult climbs compared to Kilimanjaro. Each of these Canadian peaks requires advanced mountaineering skills and experience, whereas Kilimanjaro can be climbed by individuals with proper preparation and physical fitness.